Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Jesus, Transfiguration, and the Bible

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It's time for another great sermon! What I appreciate about this message is the quality of his exegesis, how he explains the meaning of the texts in the broader context of scripture, and the focus on the Bible as God's Word to us. I am impressed with Pastor Wolfmueller's ability to preach an articulate, engaging, and thoughtful sermon while staying close to the text. What do you hear? I'd love for you to share your thoughts. Here are the texts for the sermon: Matthew 17:1-13 and 2 Peter 1:16-21


Pastor Bryan Wolfmueller / Hope Lutheran Church, Aurora CO
Sermon date: January 17, 2016 / Sermon text: Matthew 17:1-13 & 2 Peter 1:16-21

6 comments:

  1. I absolutely love this type of teaching/preaching. Have missed so many of these details during my Christian life. So happy the Lord has allowed me to find Him in this new and refreshing way. It's seriously changing my life.

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    1. Thanks for commenting. I love hearing God's Word proclaimed!

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  2. I think that suggesting Jesus is a prophet is selling Him short. He is the creator of all things. The Muslims would be affirmed in their acceptance of Jesus as prophet and not as God by the reference and interpretation of deuteronomy 18. We must strive to give the highest glory to Jesus to avoid causing people to stumble. My 2 cents...

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    1. I appreciate your comment and the opportunity to dialog about the message of this sermon. I agree with you that the Bible clearly affirms Jesus as the creator and that we should ascribe to Him the highest glory. I think Pastor Wolfmueller clearly identifies Jesus as God and the second person of the Trinity in this sermon. He references many of Jesus’s miracles, refers to Him as Lord, God the Son, the Word, and describes the transfiguration as a manifestation of Jesus as “the Son of God,” “very God of very God,” and His divine nature “beaming through His human nature.” There is no doubt in my mind that Jesus is being exalted as God in this sermon.

      When Pastor Wolfmueller refers to Jesus as our Prophet in Deuteronomy 18, he does not do this to deny or diminish His divine nature, but to express another truth of scripture regarding one of Christ’s three offices: Prophet, Priest, and King. There is a long tradition in reformation theology (both Lutheran and Calvinist) to recognize the scriptural teaching of the offices of Christ. Here is a link to an article http://www.ligonier.org/blog/jesus-threefold-office-prophet-priest-and-king/ that includes a reference to Deuteronomy 18 and the offices. Below is a short quote from the article:

      “If you are a child of God, Christ in His threefold office as Prophet, Priest, and King will mean everything to you. Do you love solus Christus? Do you love Him in His person, offices, natures, and benefits? Is He your Prophet to teach you; your Priest to sacrifice for, intercede for, and bless you; and your King to rule and guide you?”

      The Biblical truths expressed in these “offices” depend on the truth of Jesus’ divine nature and enhance our understanding of who Jesus is and what He has done for us. Individual references to Jesus in both the Old and New Testament may not always describe Jesus in His fullness, but the collective witness of scripture leaves no doubt regarding who Jesus is and what he has done for us.

      I’d love to hear your feedback. I’m enjoying the conversation.

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  3. True prophets have stood in the counsel of God, where they can hear His voice and know what He's saying to the Church. I love that statement. It causes me to want to dig into God's living Word more, as the preacher suggests, but also draw near to His living Presence through the disciplines of prayer, praise, solitude, and other means of worship. How much do we really wait on God, to hear what He's saying, and what He's already said? I think that's a huge take-away point from this message.

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  4. I read deeper and know my error. Calvin also points to deuteronomy 18 as pointing to Jesus. I was reading deuteronomy 18 as guidelines given thru Moses. He spoke of avoiding Spiritism, he speaks of granting and then God speaks about allowing for prophets rather than the awe that Moses was exposed to. The prophet would be like Moses. Then God speaks about how to tell the difference between a true and false prophet.I interpreted deuteronomy 18 as referring to the prophets such as Elijah or Elisha, etc.

    That line of thinking does not recognize God's careful revelation of Himself in the Old Testament and the glorification of Himself through the office of prophet. I also interpreted Peter to be saying that he wasn't making this all up but that Jesus as the Christ was a message he received from God.

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